Soundings

By Father David Fisher

picture of father fisher

Want to learn more from different perspectives about our lessons? Soundings is a an opportunity for our Clergy to provide different insights into our readings and scripture. You may not always agree with the Clergy's interpretations. But that is why Soundings was created. To invite thoughtful discussion. You are welcome to email the author of each article to provide your comments. Welcome to Soundings!


Before the Door of God

By Father David Fisher

picture of father fisher

Starting in September 18, I plan to use Before the Door of God: An Anthology of Devotional Poetry as a source. Before the Door of God: An Anthology of Devotional Poetry is a collection of poems edited by Jay Hopler and Kimberly Johnson. The texts included range from the seventh century BCE (Psalms 6, 8, 23, 42, and 98) to 21st-century devotional lyrics. Here’s a beginning.

Read more: Before the Door of God

Sound of Sheer Silence

By Father David Fisher

picture of father fisher

In I Kings 19, the prophet Elijah is fearful, depressed, and isolated after his victory over the priests of Baal. When King Ahab told Jezebel all that Elijah had done, and how he had killed all the prophets of Baal with the sword, she sent a messenger to Elijah saying, “So may the gods do to me, and more also, if I do not make your life like the life of one of them by this time tomorrow.” Then he was afraid; he got up and fled for his life, and came to Beersheba, which belongs to Judah; he left his servant there.

Read more: Sound of Sheer Silence

How Does Art Contribute to Faith?

By Father David Fisher

picture of father fisher

James McCullough summarizes recent work by David Brown on the topic. The arts and culture provide experiences of contact with God Himself because they actually impart the presence of the divine to the perceptive recipient. Brown proposes that meaningful aesthetic experiences have an inherently sacramental quality to them. In them and through them, Brown claims, God actually makes Himself available and accessible. He urges a move beyond the instrumental impulse of evaluating things – like church buildings or hymns or books, gardens, even sports events – toward a more intrinsic consideration.

Read more: How Does Art Contribute to Faith?

The Transparent Church

By Father David Fisher

picture of father fisher

Belgian architects Pieterjan Gijs and Arnout Van Vaerenbergh have taken the concept of transparency literally into a church, They have constructed a transparent, see-through church in the Belgian region of Haspengouw. The ten meter structure is made of 100 stacked layers and 2000 columns of steel plates, positioned in such a way as to allow visitors to almost walk through the walls. According to the point of perspective, the church can be perceived either as a traditional church structure, yet with the change of perspective the seemingly solid walls seem to disband before one's eyes in the landscape. An equally perplexing image can be perceived when one looks out to the landscape from the surrounding countryside which is redefined by abstract lines of the church’s architecture. The play of light and shadow is another interesting aspect which is only perceived when the viewer is in the church. During different times of the day, the church interior changes, according to the position of the sun and the direction of the sun light.

Read more: The Transparent Church

Abide with Me

By Father David Fisher

picture of father fisher

The best commentary on the promise of comfort expressed in Psalm 23 is a hymn – “Abide With Me” by Scottish Anglican Henry Francis Lyte. Lyte was a curate in County Wexford from 1815 to 1818. The Spectator, 3 Oct. 1925, states that Lyte wrote the hymn in 1820 while visiting a dying friend, William Augustus Le Hunte. As Lyte sat with the dying man, William kept repeating the phrase "abide with me…". After leaving William's bedside, Lyte wrote the hymn and gave a copy of it to Le Hunte's family.

Read more: Abide with Me